Valuing Connection.

Honoring the Gift of Life.

Welcome to TNet.

Participating OPOs and Transplant Programs: Don't see yours?
UCSF Transplant Center Liver, Kidney & Pancreas
Stanford Medical Center Heart
Donor Network West

We host a free online system that organ transplant recipients and the families of their donors can use to easily and safely contact one another. Some of our users choose to publish their letters, which we post on our main site to show the profound impact of organ donation on donor families and recipients.

We also share information about organ donation and transplantation with the hope that visitors will be inspired to become registered donors.

Please scroll down to learn more about TransplantNet and organ donation, or explore using the links within the navigation bar above.


Are you an organ transplant recipient or a family member of an organ donor?

You can use our website to contact your donor family or your loved one's transplant recipients. It's safe and free! Simply click the button above to get started. Once you send your letter through TransplantNet, your transplant center or OPO will review and direct your approved letter to your donor family or loved one's recipients.

Read Published Letters

Did you know?

Most organ transplants come from deceased donors. Click here to learn more.

  Life for me is so very special because of your gift. Since the transplant, I was able to see my daughter marry and was fortunate to see my first and only granddaughter, Stella grow up. She’s five and the apple of my eye. You and your loved one made all that possible for me.

Full Letter »

  Throughout the process of getting on the liver transplant list, hearing there may be a liver available and then not being a match, my faith was tested in ways I can not describe. When we received the call, it was bittersweet. We cannot imagine your grief, struggle and heartache, but hope you have a little breath of fresh air knowing that I get to be a husband and father because of your son's life.

Full Letter »

  I am writing to express my gratitude for the liver transplant I received. I was very ill and the donated liver saved my life. I am a 67 year old wife, mother and grandmother. I am now doing well and will watch my grandchildren grow. My entire family is grateful for this gift. Although my heart is filled with gratitude, words cannot fully express how I feel.

Full Letter »

How It Works

Our system streamlines communication between donor families and organ transplant recipients.

Registration

Even though the identities of both sides of an organ donation are confidential, the transplant recipient or donor family may create an account in our user portal if they wish to contact the other.

Writing and Sending a Letter

After logging in, users compose their electronic letter. Users also have the option to allow TNet administrators to publish a public version of their letter on our website.

Review and Forwarding Process

Coordinators at both the transplant center of the transplant recipient and the organ procurement organization of the donor family review and handle the electronic letters through our online platform, ensuring their safety and appropriateness. Our system updates authors via email on the status of their letters throughout this process.

Further Connection

TNet can be seen as a method of first contact, as communication can be carried out afterward via email or other means if users opt to share personal information.

Send a letter »
Read more about TNet »

The Numbers

These numbers each represent many beloved family members and friends to whom organ donation has given hope.

8

lives can be saved by a single organ donor.

85

people on average receive organ transplants each day.

22

people on the waiting list die each day due to the shortage of available organs.

122,668

candidates of all ages are currently on the waiting list for organ transplants.

30,970

life-saving organ transplants were performed in 2015 from 24,980 deceased donors and 5,990 living donors.

Donation FAQ

Anyone can indicate their wish to donate. There are no age limitations; people of all ages give and receive organ donations. Individuals with previous or current medical conditions can also be potential organ and tissue donors and should not rule themselves out.

The United Network of Organ Sharing administrates all organ distribution and matching in the US under contract with the federal government. Organs are allocated based on factors including medical need, blood and tissue type, height and weight, time on the waiting list, and geographical location. It is important to note that celebrity, wealth, and race are not included in these factors.

YES. When you’re admitted to the hospital, saving your life is the first priority, and the medical team taking care of you is separate from the transplant team. Additionally, two doctors uninvolved in donation and transplantation must declare an individual brain dead before organ donation can become a possibility.

No, donors and donor families do not pay for organ or tissue donation. Recipients pay for costs related to their transplant, often through their insurance or government health and welfare programs.

Become a Donor

Take the opportunity to save lives. Sign up as an organ & tissue donor via your state's donor registry.

Find out how »